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Into the Wild

September 17, 2015

ITWBased on a true story. After graduating from Emory University, top student and athlete Christopher McCandless abandoned his possessions, gave his entire $24,000 savings account to charity and hitchhiked to Alaska to live in the wilderness. Along the way, Christopher encounters a series of characters who shape his life.

Themes: freedom and identity, materialism and truth, family.

Christopher McCandless: I read somewhere… how important it is in life not necessarily to be strong… but to feel strong.

Christopher McCandless: I’m going to paraphrase Thoreau here… rather than love, than money, than faith, than fame, than fairness… give me truth.

Christopher McCandless: Some people feel like they don’t deserve love. They walk away quietly into empty spaces, trying to close the gaps of the past.

 

Christopher McCandless: The core of mans’ spirit comes from new experiences.

 

Ron Franz: I’m going to miss you when you go.
Christopher McCandless: I will miss you too, but you are wrong if you think that the joy of life comes principally from the joy of human relationships. God’s place is all around us, it is in everything and in anything we can experience. People just need to change the way they look at things.
Ron Franz: Yeah. I am going to take stock of that. You know I am. I want to tell you something. From bits and pieces of what you have told me about your family, your mother and your dad… And I know you have problems with the church too… But there is some kind of bigger thing that we can all appreciate and it sounds to me you don’t mind calling it God. But when you forgive, you love. And when you love, God’s light shines through you.
Christopher McCandless: Holy shit!

 

Christopher McCandless: Mr. Franz I think careers are a 20th century invention and I don’t want one.

Christopher McCandless: When you want something in life, you just gotta reach out and grab it.

 

Christopher McCandless: [written into book] Happiness only real when shared.

 

Christopher McCandless: You don’t need human relationships to be happy, God has placed it all around us.

 

[first title card] Title Card: There is a pleasure in the pathless woods; / There is a rapture on the lonely shore; / There is society, where none intrudes, / By the deep sea, and music in its roar; / I love not man the less, but Nature more… / – Lord Byron

[last title cards] Title Card: In memory / Christopher Johnson McCandless / February 12, 1968 – August 18, 1992
Title Card: Two weeks after Chris’s death, moose hunters discovered his body in the bus.
[This self-portrait was found undeveloped in his camera]
Title Card: On September 19, 1992, Carine McCandless flew with her brother’s ashes from Alaska to the eastern seaboard. She carried them with her on the plane… in her backpack.
Title Card: The filmmakers thank Jon Krakauer for his guidance and gratefully acknowledge Walt, Billie, Carine and the entire McCandless family for their brave support in the making of this film.

 

Christopher McCandless: It should not be denied that being footloose has always exhilarated us. It is associated in our minds with escape from history and oppression and law and irksome obligations. Absolute freedom. And the road has always led west.

“Hey listen old man now don’t psychoanalyze me alright, SHUT UP! I’m taking you out to where we’re going (where you going?) I told you, we’re going nowhere.”
“the core of mans’ spirit comes from new experiences.”

Sherry Simpson: “Jon Krakauer made up a story about him, by way of telling his own, and every pilgrim since his death has shaped him into something different as well. I’m doing it right now, too

Chris: So many people live within unhappy circumstances and yet will not take the initiative to change their situation because they are conditioned to a life of security, conformity, and conservatism, all of which may appear to give one peace of mind, but in reality nothing is more damaging to the adventurous spirit within a man than a secure future.

His journal contains an excerpt from a Robinson Jeffers poem titled “Wise Men in Their Bad Hours”:

Death’s a fierce meadowlark: but to die having made

Something more equal to centuries

Than muscle and bone, is mostly to shed weakness.

The mountains are dead stone, the people

Admire or hate their stature, their insolent quietness,

The mountains are not softened or troubled

And a few dead men’s thoughts have the same temper.

On the other side of the page, McCandless added, “I HAVE HAD A HAPPY LIFE AND THANK THE LORD. GOODBYE AND MAY GOD BLESS ALL!”

His body was found in his sleeping bag inside the bus on September 6, 1992, weighing an estimated 67 pounds (30 kg). He had been dead for more than two weeks.

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